Posts tagged ‘Entrepreneur’

Call to Action…Go Big and Stand Out!

calls-to-action-tour-providersIf your website doesn’t have some sort of call to action, there’s a good chance you’re losing out on sales. Calls to action tell your readers to do exactly what you’d like them to. And if your call to action is engaging, your readers will be far more likely to take that action.

 

Consider these tips for creating a compelling call to action from Entrepreneur.com

Create a personable experience. Let’s say that you’re promoting an eBook about do-it-yourself oil changes and you’ve written an article about the importance of regular oil changes for a vehicle. Instead of ending your piece with “Those interested in learning more can click here to buy this eBook,” it’s better to say something like “Click here to buy this eBook and become a master oil changer!” Unlike the first instance, the second instance speaks directly to the reader as if they’re a personal friend. It also tells a small story that tells readers exactly what they can expect after buying and reading the eBook. And in the end, this personable experience takes readers beyond a basic pitch and creates an engaging and compelling reason for them to buy.

Provide directions. Most people on the Internet are busy doing things like checking their email, surfing websites, and participating in social networks – all at the same time, so chances are that they won’t want to spend the time trying to figure out how to actually take advantage of your offer after they have read about it. Telling your readers where to click, explaining when to join a live session, and providing links to in-depth instructions when necessary, can noticeably increase your conversion rates.

Go big and stand out. Make sure that your calls to action stand out from the rest of your content so there isn’t a chance that it will be missed by readers just skimming your page. In fact, a good CTA that catches the eye of readers as soon as they reach the page may find themselves more intrigued by the content that precedes it.

Keep it short and simple. To avoid giving your CTAs a salesy feel, it’s important to keep them short and simple. Tell just enough of a story to spark interest and get straight to the point by following up with an actionable demand. By simply saying “click here to buy” instead of “check out all the benefits” ensures that readers know what to expect when they do click your link, and it gives all the power to your landing page so it can do the job of selling for you. Each call to action you create shouldn’t be any longer than just a line or two – this will ensure that you don’t leave any room for fluff or desperation.

NJC Printing provides quality digital and offset printing to businesses in St. Louis, Missouri and throughout the Midwest. Please visit our website at www.NJCPrint.com to learn more about us or to Request An Estimate.

Creating a Logo that Makes a Good Impression

Hiring-a-good-logo-designing-company-to-create-your-logoAs the old adage goes, you only get one chance to make a good impression. And, for small businesses, it’s vital to make a good impression with branding. Without a strong logo, your branding will fail to send the message that you do great work.

Consider these five tips from Entrepreneur.com:

Don’t be generic.
Your logo needs to convey what you do and who you are, and leave a positive brand impression. That’s why small business logo design is a different animal from corporate logo design. Corporations can throw enough money into marketing to ensure that people associate any symbol or graphic with their name. Small businesses don’t have that luxury: Each impression is so important. You need to very quickly connect with your audience members and give them something to latch on to — at the same time that you give them something disruptive in your competitive space.

Pick typography that reflects what you stand for.
The vast majority of small business brands are built upon two primary elements: their typographic elements and their graphic or iconic element. Together, these factors form the basic structure for most logo designs. Typography communicates much about your brand — whether it’s a brand that’s whimsical or elegant, established or common, fresh or futuristic. Your typography should be in harmony with, and balance with, the graphic or icon in order to optimize the audience’s first impression.

Choose colors wisely.
Certain industries have very typical color palettes that are traditional to their industry. For example, heating and air conditioning companies often use red and blue in their branding.

Consider how your logo will be used.
Whenever possible, avoid using a logo that requires a lot of explanation. If your small business relies on outdoor media, such as signs or vehicles, a memorable icon is especially important. One simple test is to cover up the lettering and simply look at the graphic. Does it give the viewer an idea as to the nature of the business?

Hire a pro.
With so much of your success riding on how well your branding performs, this isn’t the place to cut corners. Yet, so many businesses look for the least expensive option, because they don’t understand the value of a good brand and how it will affect their chances of success. The most important part of any branding exercise is an open dialogue between the brand strategist and the client. Choose a firm where you will speak directly with the person developing your brand.

NJC Printing provides quality digital and offset printing to businesses in St. Louis, Missouri and throughout the Midwest. Please visit our website at www.NJCPrint.com to learn more about us or to Request An Estimate.

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